2020 Daytime Seminars

The Boston Sea Rovers are the proud sponsors of the “Longest Continuously Running Dive Show in the World,” a distinction made possible primarily due to the excellent quality of speakers that have continued to grace our stages. We take great pleasure in hosting the best educators, explorers, scientists, divers and speakers in the world. The purpose of these lectures help us to achieve our club our mission, “To educate the general public about the underwater world.”

Our daytime presentations form the backbone of our show. In two days we host over 40 speakers covering a myriad of diving and marine related topics. Each hour there are three simultaneous lectures being held on Saturday and Sunday from 9am to 5 pm. You get to choose which speaker or topic you would like to see based on your interests.

We hope you enjoyed our 2019 Presentations.  Below is a preview of some of next year’s presentations.  The schedule will be finalized in January. Stay tuned!

 

2020 Presentation Summaries

Are sharks smarter than divers? Conclusions from 50 years of shark research

Sharks play a role in the concerns of most divers. Many wish to dive with sharks. Recent studies have shown some sharks to be intelligent. Drawing on a lifetime of personal research with social nurse sharks and the work of colleagues; Wes Pratt will explore the realities of co-existing with sharks.

Presented by:
H. Wes Pratt

Harold “Wes” Pratt currently works on Shark Biology with a specialty on the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. He worked for NOAA’s NMFS researching North Atlantic large sharks for 34 years and is now Adjunct with the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life, New England Aquarium and Mote Marine Laboratory. His current project is ‘Nurse Shark Research.’

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Britannic 2019

On May 10, 2019, a group of ten divers and six support crew sailed from mainland Athens to Kea Island, Greece to dive the famed ocean liner Britannic. Blessed with unusually good weather, the May 2019 expedition team made six dives to Britannic in an eleven-day period. This allowed them to explore, document, and photograph numerous areas of the vessel. In this presentation, expedition team members will tell the story of Britannic and reveal, through video and still footage, what she looks like today, more than 100 years after her historic sinking. In addition to sharing Britannic’s story with Sea Rovers audience members, the team will talk about what it takes to put together an expedition of this magnitude. The presenters will share behind the scenes footage of the team, their dive plans, the integral role the surface support played in their success, and how this group of international divers – some who had never met before – came together for a once-in-a-lifetime experience in the Aegean Sea.

Presented by:
Captain Joe Mazraani and Jennifer Sellitti

Shipwreck exploration is a way of life for Joe Mazraani.  He owns and operates the dive vessel Tenacious, which was specifically acquired and outfitted to accomplish several projects, including locating and exploring the U-550 and other deep, uncharted wrecks in the North Atlantic. A criminal defense attorney by trade, Joe holds an open-circuit Trimix certification and was recently certified as a closed circuit diver.

Jennifer Sellitti is a regular crew member of the dive boat Tenacious, managing a number of topside operations during dive trips.  She also performs historical research on the ships Tenacious dives and to help locate ships that are the subject of new projects for the team.  Jennifer also develops and delivers presentations on Tenacious projects with the goal of educating the public about the historical significance and importance of wreck diving in the North Atlantic.

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Citizen Scientists Monitoring Seagrass

Seagrasses perform numerous important ecological functions, including carbon sequestration and functioning as a nursery area. Natural resource managers need data on location and condition of seagrass meadows for better management decisions. Divers, acting as citizen scientists, have great potential in gathering important data on this critically important habitat. This talk will focus on specific ways divers can collect data on seagrass, so it will be useful to natural resource managers.

Marine Forests

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Philip Colarusso

Phil has worked on seagrass conservation at EPA for 30+ years. Through EPA, he holds a Scientifc and Divemaster certification and functions as the alternate Unit Dive Officer for the Region I dive program. He has a Master’s degree in Aquatic Toxicology from UMass/Boston and a PhD from Northeastern University in Marine Biology. His area of expertise is in segrass physiology and conservation. He has spent well over 500 hours underwater in seagrass meadows.

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iNaturalist

Learn how to use iNaturalist to explore and share your observations from the natural world. iNaturalist.org is a joint initiative of the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society.

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Ted Maney

Ted Maney is a biology instructor and underwater researcher at Salem State University.  Formerly the Diving Safety Officer at Northeastern University and a past President of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS), Ted has been training scientific divers and conducting underwater research for over 35 years.  Current research projects involve benthic marine ecology studies of rock walls, kelp beds, and eel grass communities in addition to offshore mussel aquaculture. Ted earned his M.S. at UMass Boston studying the ecology of the marine gastropod Lacuna vincta and its role as a member of the kelp bed community.

Ted Maney

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Never Forgotten: The Hunt for Eagle 56

Note: This will be Co presented by the Nomad Exploration Team. We are still deciding on exactly who.At 8 am on April 23, 1945, sixty two American sailors cast off from Portland, Maine aboard the USS Eagle 56 for what should have been a routine coastal patrol. Less than 5 hours later, their ship had sunk, 13 men had been pulled from the frigid water, and 49 families were about to learn that their loved ones were never coming home. The US Navy initially classified the sinking as an “accident”, leaving the families wondering, “who aboard that ship was so negligent, that they killed my son.” (Harold Peterson – Eagle 56 Survivor).

From the beginning, the survivors told a different story. As WWII progressed, the truth about the Eagle faded into the background but those families and survivors never forgot. It took a passionate researcher and a team of dedicated technical divers working in strong currents and frequently poor visibility (200 ft deep) to locate and document the wreckage. The entire team finally brought this important event to the forefront, setting the record straight, validating the survivors’ testimony, and providing closure for the families.

Note: This will be Co-presented by the Nomad Exploration Team. We are still deciding on exactly who.

Presented by:
Ryan King

For over 20 years, Ryan has been diving, teaching, and photographing marine life, caves and wrecks from Canada to the Caribbean. He has a passion for helping others enjoy and appreciate the underwater world.

Ryan King

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REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project

Divers and snorkelers participate in citizen science and contribute to the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project. Using the REEF website to submit data from roving diver surveys of fish and invertebrates.

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Uma Mirani

Uma Mirani, an avid scuba diver for more 20 years, has been a member of the New England Aquarium Dive Club since 2000. As an active board member and current President of the New England Aquarium Dive Club, Uma has worked with REEF to host the Northeast Great Annual Fish Count in support of the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project. Uma earned an MS in Marine Biology from Northeastern University Three Seas Program and is also a volunteer with the New England Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue and Rehabilitation team.

Uma Mirani

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Please note that participants scheduled to speak at any Sea Rovers Clinic event are subject to last minute travel and work emergencies that are inherent when working with state-of-the-art gear being used to push the boundaries of exploration and discovery. Participant list subject to change at last moment – please come back often for updates and additions to our exciting film festival line up.
Boston Sea Rovers