2020 Daytime Seminars

The Boston Sea Rovers are the proud sponsors of the “Longest Continuously Running Dive Show in the World,” a distinction made possible primarily due to the excellent quality of speakers that have continued to grace our stages. We take great pleasure in hosting the best educators, explorers, scientists, divers and speakers in the world. The purpose of these lectures help us to achieve our club our mission, “To educate the general public about the underwater world.”

Our daytime presentations form the backbone of our show. In two days we host over 40 speakers covering a myriad of diving and marine related topics. Each hour there are three simultaneous lectures being held on Saturday and Sunday from 9am to 5 pm. You get to choose which speaker or topic you would like to see based on your interests.

 

 


Saturday

Lunch

Sunday

Lunch


2020 Presentation Summaries

Add Compelling Aerial Footage & Topside GoPro Footage to Your Trip Video

Experience trip videos from around the world that include Quadcopter and GoPro camera footage.
See what’s possible with drones and these small but powerful action cameras.

Topics covered:
-Drone Usage for Aerial Capture while traveling and more!
Topside Video & Timelapses
-Tools for stability

 

Presented by:
Joel Penner

Joel is the founder of Newmediasoup, LLC, a multimedia and event coverage company.  Joel was an early adopter of the use of DSLR cameras for shooting high definition underwater video and currently shoots 4K Ultra High Definition video as part of his business. A commercial drone pilot, Joel is adept at drone usage to capture interesting and fresh aerial perspectives. He is also an active product tester for Backscatter assisting with underwater video camera testing and video editing for new products. His images have been published in various magazines. Along with his wife Jennifer, they have authored many published articles on imaging and are regular presenters at scuba diving trade shows.

Joel Penner

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African diving – Where in the world is Moheli

Located in the Mozambique channel, the tiny island of Moheli in the Comoros is visited by fewer than 100 divers a year. Turtles nest on its shores, whales migrate to its waters and its reefs host a number of surprising species, not to mention schooling fish by the hundreds, mantas and dolphins.

Presented by:
Michael Labrecque and Julie Ouimet

Michel and Julie are seasoned divers who have traveled to some of the most remote areas of our planet. They are technical trimix divers, rebreather divers and accomplished dive training professionals. Since 2014, they have devoted themselves to underwater imagery and exploration. Michel is a photojournalist and Julie is a videographer and filmmaker. They are both Fellows of the Explorers Club and Associate Members of the Boston Sea Rovers. They have twice been bestowed the honor of carrying the Explorers flag, contributed to the creation of an MPA and received the Explorers Club Citation of Merit. In 2016, Michel was named a PADI Ambassador. Julie is a member of the Women Divers Hall of Fame.

Michael Labrecque and Julie Ouimet

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Are Sharks Smarter Than Divers? Conclusions from 50 years of shark research

Sharks play a role in the concerns of most divers. Many wish to dive with sharks. Recent studies have shown some sharks to be intelligent. Drawing on a lifetime of personal research with social nurse sharks and the work of colleagues; Wes Pratt will explore the realities of co-existing with sharks.

Presented by:
H. Wes Pratt

Harold “Wes” Pratt currently works on shark biology, particularly with the nurse shark, Ginglymostoma cirratum. He worked for NOAA’s NMFS researching North Atlantic large sharks for 34 years and is now Adjunct with the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life, New England Aquarium and Mote Marine Laboratory. His current project is ‘Nurse Shark Research.’

H. Wes Pratt

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Are you Medically Fit to Dive?

Medical Fitness is required of every diver before they enter the water. The criteria for medical fitness to dive will be reviewed. Both risk and common medical conditions that can affect our medical fitness to dive will be discussed. Common conditions will include” Asthma, Hypertension, and Diabetes. The responsibilities of both the diver as well as your health care provider will be outlined.

Presented by:
David Charash

Dr David Charash is a Dive Medicine Physician, Board Certified in Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine. He is the Principal at Dive Medicine and Hyperbaric Consultants LLC. and he is the Medical Director at Inova Health Systems in Alexandria, Virginia. Dr Charash is a DAN Referral Physician and DAN Instructor, and he has lectured at the United States Coast Guard Academy and the United States Navy Base Naval Undersea Medical Institute on Dive Medicine and Basic and Advanced Diving Physics.

David Charash

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Boston Sea Rovers Intern Update

As the 2019 Boston Sea Rovers Intern, Nico worked at the New England and National Aquariums, traveled to Bonaire to work with Kid’s Sea Camp, dove the wrecks of Bell Island Newfoundland, and spent time at commercial diving school in Seattle. Nico is trained as a commercial diver and underwater welder and now works for Shoreline Diving.

Presented by:
Nico Pellegri

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Cameras and Conservation

A look at my journey from commercial fisherman to shark photographer and ecotourism operator. Brief look back at fishing and focus on photography of blue and mako sharks, day and night off of the Rhode Island coast.

Presented by:
Brian Raymond

A life long Rhode Islander and former commercial fisherman, Brian is no stranger to the cold waters of the North Atlantic. After co-founding Rhode Island Shark Diving in 2010, his professional life has been about one thing… sharks! The skills he learned while fishing for nearly a decade, have made him uniquely suited for his new life on the water, working as a captain on a shark photography and research vessel. Allowing him to pursue his passion of diving and filming sharks, Brian has had his images featured in various publications both in print and on-line and made multiple appearances on Discovery Channel’s Shark Week.
Brian Raymond

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Diving in the Land of the Pharaohs: The Egyptian Red Sea

In the shadow of the Pyramids of Giza and under the eternal gaze of the Great Sphynx, the Egyptian Red Sea beckons divers to explore its underwater treasure. Journey to these fabled lands with Eco-Photo Explorers to experience an adventure for the ages. Using photography and video, Eco-Photo Explorers will first visit ancient Egyptian monuments before exploring the jaw-dropping marine eco-system of the Red Sea from a liveaboard dive operation.

Presented by:
Michael Salvarezza – Christopher Weaver

Michael Salvarezza and Christopher Weaver have been diving the waters of the world since 1978.  They have presented their work to many audiences and have been published in numerous magazines including National Geographic Adventure.  Their work has also been used to support a number of research and educational programs, including the Jason Project for Education, the Atlantis Marine World Aquarium in New York, the Cambridge University and the University of Groningen Arctic Centre work on monitoring the transformation of historic features in Antarctica and Svalbard.

Michael Salvarezza – Christopher Weaver

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Diving Indonesia

Join Nauticam Ambassador Hergen Spalink for a trip across the popular dive regions of Indonesia including Bali, Komodo, Alor, the Banda Sea, Ambon, Lembeh, Bunaken, Triton Bay and Raja Ampat through photos and videos taken over more than ten years living and working across the archipelago.

Presented by:
Hergen Spalink

Hergen Spalink is a Nauticam Ambassador who lives and works at the forefront of underwater imaging. Since 2010, Hergen and his partner Kerri Bingham have been leading exclusive underwater photography safaris and workshops in the world’s best dive destinations, where guests benefit from the couple’s deep passion for the underwater world and twelve years of experience managing dive businesses in Indonesia and the Caribbean. Hergen is also the co-author of the Underwater Photography Series, along with Photoshop guru Deke McClelland, at Lynda.com. Hergen is both a PADI-certified scuba diving instructor and an Adobe Certified Expert in Lightroom.

Hergen Spalink

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Diving Vancouver

Have you ever seen a nudibranch over six inches long? A giant Pacific octopus or sea anemones over three feet tall? Diving off the coast of Vancouver British Columbia you will encounter many fascinating and amazing sights. Jacques Cousteau is quoted as saying that “Vancouver Island is the best temperate-water diving in the world second only to the Red Sea”. Dust off your dry suit and explore the beauty below Vancouver.

Presented by:
Peter Venoutsos

Peter Venoutsos started scuba diving in 1976 and became a commercial diver in 1983. He has worked for private underwater engineering firms, the federal government, and the United States Navy. He is an active member of the Connecticut Underwater Archaeology Committee. Peter has published many diving articles and teaches underwater photography.

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Don’t Mess with Me

Do you know the difference between poisonous and venomous? Blue ring octopus, stonefish, and stinging jellyfish are only some of the poisonous and venomous creatures that inhabit the marine world. In a collaboration between author Paul Erickson and photographer Andy Martinez, Don’t Mess with Me describes the fascinating lives of some of these animals. Join Andy for the discussion.

Presented by:
Andrew Martinez

Andy Martinez has been diving and photographing marine life for over 40 years and his work has been used in many magazines and books. His popular app, Marine Life North Atlantic, is a necessary resource for anyone wanting to know the critters from this area.  Andy’s new book, Don’t Mess with Me is a peek into how sea creatures defend themselves. He has led many diving groups to the Philippines, Indonesia and many islands in the Caribbean.

Andrew Martinez

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Excavation and MIA Repatriation on the B-24 Tulsamerican at 40m

In 2017 a team from the Defense Personnel Accounting Agency, Lund University, The National Park Service, and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution excavated the nose section of the B24 Tulsamerican in search of the remains of three US servicemen missing in action since the crash in December 1943. The Tulsamerican lies in just over 40m of water off the island in Vis Croatia. This talk describes the mission, the men, the loss, the re-discovery, the excavation, and ultimately the return of one of America’s fallen heroes.

Presented by:
Carl Kaiser

Carl L. Kaiser, Program Manager, holds a B.S, M.S., and PhD in Mechanical Engineering (Robotics) from Colorado State University. He is currently a Program Manager in the Applied Ocean Physics and Engineering Department at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Until recently he managed the AUV portion of the National Deep Submergence Facility and now manages an independent portfolio of UUV projects funded by ONR, NOAA, NSF, DARPA and others. His research interests include novel applications for AUVs including in confined spaces, human robot interaction via limited or degraded communication channels, and diver robot interactions. He is also an avid technical diver for both work and play.

Carl Kaiser

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Exploring Fluorescence to 3,000’ in a Manned Submersible

Underwater fluorescence is usually associated with night dives in shallow water, and scientific theories about it relate to the interaction with light. But what might you find where it is always dark? This presentation will recount the experience in conducting the first deep-water explorations for fluorescence using a manned submersible.

Presented by:
Charles Mazel

Charles Mazel is the pioneer of the modern era of night diving to explore fluorescence, including development of the equipment to see and record the phenomenon. He is a Boston Sea Rover and the founder of NIGHTSEA, the first company to provide lights and camera accessories for underwater fluorescence. He has conducted extensive scientific research on the phenomenon and in the course of this he conducted the first fluorescence exploration dives to a depth of 3,000’ in a manned submersible, making 9 dives over the course of two scientific missions, one in the Bahamas and one in the Gulf of Mexico.

Charles Mazel

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From Shore to Deep Sea: Maritime Archaeological Research and Investigations of the Night Boats PS Portland and City of Rockland

In the summer and fall of 2019, a team from WHOI, Marine Imaging Technologies, and NOAA’s SBNMS conducted an interdisciplinary exploration, survey, and telepresence outreach of biological and cultural sites within the Sanctuary, using some of the most cutting-edge underwater technology available to date. This work included surveys of the PS Portland and other shipwrecks using custom-made ROVs designed for collection of 4K motion video imagery plus 3D photogrammetry. The PS City of Rockland rests in tidal waters off Little Misery Island. Since 2018, students from Salem State University have investigated this shoreline shipwreck to understand site formation and cultural processes as evidenced in the archaeological record. This presentation will discuss latest research, future goals, and how these two shipwrecks, Portland and City of Rockland, provide case studies to engage new learners in the field of maritime archaeology — each in their own unique ways.

Presented by:
Calvin Mires

Dr. Calvin Mires has almost 20 years of experience in maritime archaeology and underwater cultural heritage. He is a Research Associate at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a Visiting Assistant Professor at Bridgewater State University in the Department of Anthropology. Calvin has led and worked on more than 30 maritime archaeology projects around the world, including Greek and Roman shipwrecks and harbors, Sweden’s iconic warship, Vasa, Confederate blockade runners in North and South Carolina, and various sites in Bermuda, the Caribbean Sea, Pacific Ocean, and the Great Lakes. He co-directs a maritime archaeology field school in cooperation with the Massachusetts Board of Underwater Archaeological Resources, the Trustees of Reservations, and the National Park Service. Current projects include archaeological investigations of 1626 Sparrow Hawk and deep-sea research on shipwrecks in Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary (SBNMS).

Calvin Mires

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Humpback Whales: Exciting Encounters With One of the Largest Mammals

Humpback whales migrate to the warm water around Moorea to give birth and raise their calves before heading back to Antarctica to feed. Observing, listening, learning about and photographing these once endangered magnificent enormous mammals and their complex social structure and interactions is an amazing experience.

Presented by:
Ron Watkins

Ron Watkins is a photographer, writer and trip leader specializing in underwater and topside nature photography. He uses his photography, writing and storytelling as a media to raise awareness and promote conservation issues that he has personally observed over the last three decades. Ron is passionate about sharing his knowledge of photography with others by writing articles, presenting and leading photo workshops. His work has been recognized for over 18 years in international photo competitions including the prestigious Nature’s Best Windland Smith Rice International Awards and the Underwater Photographer of the Year, as well as appearing in numerous magazines around the world.

Ron Watkins

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Lake Erie Technical Wreck Diving: A Guide to Lake Erie’s Deepest Wrecks

Dive to Lake Erie’s deepest wreck. Relive some of the most harrowing tales lost to history. This first of its kind presentation blends unique storytelling, rare archival photos, and spectacular underwater photography of the deepest and least visited wrecks in Lake Erie.

Presented by:
Erik Petkovic

Erik is an explorer, author, maritime historian, technical wreck diver, and shipwreck researcher who has over 20 years of diving experience. Erik has been featured in dive publications worldwide and is a regular contributor and columnist to several magazines. Erik is the author of the highly popular books Shipwrecks of Lake Erie Volume One, Lake Erie Technical Wreck Diving Guide, and the Shipwreck Monograph Series. Learn more about Erik at www.ErikPetkovic.com.

Erik Petkovic

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Lilliput vs Brobdingnag: or, Can you shoot it all; Macro or Big Animal?

The dichotomy between the macro world and the hunt for big animals reflects the greatest challenge for image makers. Which lens to choose? I don’t have multiple cameras and a Sherpa. Should I go wide, or stick with macro? Find out how to deal with this ongoing challenge from a pro. The answer is easier than you think!

Presented by:
Nancy McGee

Explorer and filmmaker Nancy McGee has lived a life of adventure and diversity. Nancy McGee has lived a life of adventure and diversity. An Explorers Club Fellow, she is the first female Exosuit pilot and has dived and filmed on 7 continents. She has been the first to explore several archipelagos and opened tourism in the Andaman and Forgotten Islands. She is an inductee into the Women Divers Hall of Fame, working as an explorer, filmmaker, author, emcee and passionate educator.

Nancy McGee

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Marine Forests

Seagrasses perform numerous important ecological functions, including carbon sequestration and serveing as a nursery area for juvenile fish and invertebrates. Natural resource managers need data on location and condition of seagrass meadows for better management decisions. Divers, acting as citizen scientists, have great potential to gather important data on this critically important habitat. This talk will focus on specific ways divers can collect data on seagrass, so it will be useful to natural resource managers.

Marine Forests

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Philip Colarusso

Phil has worked on seagrass conservation at EPA for 30+ years. Through EPA, he holds a Scientific and Divemaster certification and functions as the alternate Unit Dive Officer for the Region I dive program. He has a Master’s degree in Aquatic Toxicology from UMass/Boston and a PhD from Northeastern University in Marine Biology. His area of expertise is in seagrass physiology and conservation. He has spent well over 500 hours underwater in seagrass meadows.

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Never Forgotten: The Hunt for Eagle 56

At 8 am on April 23, 1945, sixty-two American sailors cast off from Portland, Maine aboard the USS Eagle 56 for a routine coastal patrol. Less than 5 hours later, their ship had sunk, 13 men had been pulled from the frigid water, and 49 families were about to learn that their loved ones were never coming home. The US Navy initially classified the sinking as an “accident”, leaving the families wondering, “who aboard that ship was so negligent, that they killed my son.” (Harold Peterson – Eagle 56 Survivor). However, the survivors told a different story. As WWII progressed, the truth about the Eagle faded into the background but those families and survivors never forgot. Working in strong currents and frequently poor visibility (200 ft deep), the team located and documented the wreckage to bring this important event to the forefront, set the record straight, validate the survivors’ testimony, and provide closure for the families.

 

Presented by:
Ryan King and Jeff Goodreau

For over 20 years, Ryan has been diving, teaching, and photographing marine life, caves and wrecks from Canada to the Caribbean. He has a passion for helping others enjoy and appreciate the underwater world.

Jeff hails from the state of New Hampshire and is married to his loving wife Mindy. A truck driver by day, Jeff lives to hunt wrecks in his free time. As avid mixed gas rebreather diver with over 20 years of wreck diving experience, Jeff’s diving has taken him to wrecks up and down the Eastern Seaboard, throughout the Great Lakes and England.

Ryan King and Jeff Goodreau

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New Dirty Tricks for Underwater Photographers

Straight from the Go Ask Erin laboratory, Erin Quigley demonstrates new Lightroom and Photoshop sorcery to make your underwater images shine. Think you can’t sharpen an out-of-focus eye? Think again. Join Erin for a fun foray into the dark arts and add some new dirty tricks to your repertoire.

Presented by:
Erin Quigley

Erin Quigley is an Adobe ACE certified expert specializing in post-production techniques specifically developed for underwater shooters. She is an award-winning photographer and editor, and a member of the Women Divers Hall of Fame, Boston Sea Rovers, and Ocean Artists Society. Erin writes the Imaging Techniques column for Scuba Diving magazine, leads trips, and teaches workshops worldwide.

Erin Quigley

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Old World Diving

Europe is rarely considered a dive destination for Americans. This introduction to diving in the Old World will highlight its incredible diversity from the Mid Atlantic Ridge islands of Azores and Iceland, to the shipwrecks of Scapa Flow and Croatia and the marine life and orcas of Norway. We bet you will add another destination or two to your bucket list after this presentation.

Presented by:
Faith Ortins

Starting as a scientific diver and volunteer public safety diver in the 1980’s, Faith became a technical diver and dive store owner in MA before joining DUI’s sales team.  She worked with DUI to develop some of the first women’s dry suits and created DUI’s DemoTour and DiveOps Programs, which promoted local diving and education about dry suits. With thousands of dives over her 40-year diving career, she has led expeditions to all 7 continents and all 5 oceans including both poles.  She now devotes all her energy to her new company Blue Green Expeditions, running guided expeditions to unique destinations.

Faith Ortins

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Over the River …and Deep Underground!

Let’s dive into the Floridan aquifer for a behind the scenes look at cave diving with famed cinematographer and director, Tom Fitz. We will emerge in the Rainbow River and drift down this pristine ecosystem following two turtle scientists who study these ancient creatures as indicators of the river’s health.

Presented by:
Amy Giannotti

Amy Giannotti is a marine ecologist and proudly represents Schoolyard Films as their Director of Development. She has extensive experience in freshwater and marine environments, including underwater caves and problems with invasive species. Amy has a B.S. in biology from Marietta College and a M.S. in environmental sciences from the University of Virginia. During her career she has initiated many educational and outreach programs for youth, including a variety of projects related to the preservation of cave, karst, groundwater, and marine systems in these regions. Schoolyard Films produces high-end nature and wildlife documentaries for K-12 youth that are accessible to all and FREE!

Amy Giannotti

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REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project

Divers and snorkelers participate in citizen science and contribute to the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project. This presentation will show how to use the REEF website to submit data from roving diver surveys of fish and invertebrates.

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Uma Mirani

Uma Mirani has been an avid scuba diver for more 20 years and a member of the New England Aquarium Dive Club since 2000. An active board member and current President of the New England Aquarium Dive Club, Uma has worked with REEF to host the Northeast Great Annual Fish Count in support of the REEF Volunteer Fish Survey Project. Uma earned an MS in Marine Biology from Northeastern University Three Seas Program and is also a volunteer with the New England Aquarium Marine Mammal Rescue and Rehabilitation team.

Uma Mirani

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Retrospective of Blue Water White Death

Blue Water, White Death is a 1971 American documentary about sharks which was produced by Peter Gimbel and James Lipscomb.[2]  This presentation is a retrospective of Blue Water White Death as the inspiration for Jaws with Peter Lake & Stuart Cody.

 

Presented by:
Nick Caloyianis Peter Lake & Stuart Cody

Nick Caloyianis began as a cold-water diver and biology graduate student and went on to apprentice for several years in Mexico with filmmaker Ramon Bravo, perfecting his craft with 16mm and 35mm formats. In 1977, Nick formed an alliance with the legendary Peter Gimble and was selected as a cameraman on the historic 1981 film expedition ANDREA DORIA: THE FINAL CHAPTER. Nick also pursued natural history subjects ranging from humpback whales off Hawaii to orca whales off Norway, as well as one-of-a-kind footage of the Greenland shark under the ice in the Arctic and rare shark mating behavior in the Gulf of Mexico. Nick’s camera work has garnered numerous awards, including several Emmys, Cine Golden Eagles, an Oscar, a NOGI, and the Earthwatch Award.

Peter Lake & Stuart Cody were original crew members on the production of Blue Water, White Death. Peter was one of the best photographers of that period and did many other projects including a behind the scenes film about the Hollywood film, The Deep. Stuart Cody is a legendary pioneer in the development of cinema verity sound recording and was also involved in both of Peter Gimbels’ Andrea Doria projects

Nick Caloyianis Peter Lake & Stuart Cody

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Revillagigedo – An Ocean for Life

On November 24, 2017, the Mexican government signed a decree creating Mexico’s largest marine reserve to date.
More than 57,000 square miles, a vast rectangle in the ocean encompassing the four Revillagigedo Islands is fully protected. Revillagigedo National Park is home to many sharks, rays, and cetaceans. All forms of fishing are prohibited and mining and tourism development in the reserve and on the islands are banned, creating the largest marine protected area in North America.

Presented by:
Erick Higuera

Erick Higuera is a Mexican multi-award winning wildlife filmmaker; photographer and marine biologist specialized in marine wildlife films and aerial cinematography. For over 20 years, he has explored the waters surrounding the Baja California Peninsula, Guadalupe Island and the Revillagigedo National Park filming and photographing great white sharks, giant mantas, whales, dolphins, billfish and other spectacles in the deep blue off Mexico’s Pacific shores. Eric is also one of the principal leaders of MANTA PACIFICO group whose mission is to lead scientific research of the Oceanic Giant Manta in the Gulf of California and the Revillagigedo National Park.

Erick Higuera

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Sargassum Invades the Caribbean Sea

Sargassum seaweeds have been a valuable part of ocean ecology until recent massive, uncontained, explosive growth has impacted shallow water and shoreline ecology and threatened coastal businesses and communities throughout the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico. While the search for answers and solutions continues the constant threat of environmental impacts has people, businesses and communities on edge. Join us as we view the impacts of invasive Sargassum seaweed and discuss its causes and solutions to the problem.

Presented by:
George Buckley

George Buckley is an environmental consultant, educator and filmmaker and he has led field research projects with Earthwatch Expeditions on horseshoe crabs, bay ecology and coral reefs. His work has been recognized with the EPA Lifetime Achievement Award, BTS Diver of the Year and Bonaire’s ACCOLADE Medal. At Harvard University he earned the Excellence in Teaching and Distinguished Service Awards. His film ‘Bonaire Bonanza’ won the ‘Palme d’Or Award’. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Boston Sea Rovers, the New England Aquarium, the EARTHECHO Foundation, Boston Malacological Club and the ENVIROTHON Council

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Saving Gretel The Great White Shark

This presentation celebrates the 15th anniversary of Gretel, a 14 foot female white shark that entered a shallow estuary in Massachusetts on September 21, 2004. She was tagged immediately, but remained trapped in the pond for two weeks. As she progressively weakened, her fate remained in the hands of a group of biologists. Gretel was the first white shark tagged with satellite-based technology in the North Atlantic and, in many ways, an omen of what was to come.

Presented by:
Greg Skomal

Dr. Gregory Skomal is an accomplished marine biologist, photographer, author, and 2015 Boston Sea Rovers Diver of the Year. As a senior scientist with MA Fisheries, he has been studying sharks for over 35 years and he has written numerous scientific research papers. Greg has appeared in a number of film and television documentaries, including programs for National Geographic, Discovery Channel, and PBS. His book, The Shark Handbook, explores the world of sharks.

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Science in the Phoenix Islands Protected Area: a decade past and future

The Phoenix Islands Protected Area (PIPA) is the largest and deepest UNESCO World Heritage Site on the planet, and was one of the catalysts for large-scale marine conservation in the Pacific and globally. PIPA is now one of the oldest large-scale marine protected areas and has experienced 3 major high thermal events (resulting in coral bleaching). The fate of PIPA’s ecosystems has implications for climate survival the world over, as does the success of PIPA’s policies and enforcement. The PIPA science program formally began in 2010; a decade later, what have we learned? And in the decade to come, what do we need to know?

Presented by:
Randi Rotjan

Randi Rotjan is currently a Research Assistant Professor at Boston University. Her research ranges from tropical to temperate corals, and she investigates questions related to ecophysiology and resilience. She is the Chief Scientist of the Phoenix Islands Protected Area Conservation Trust, and the co-Chair of the Phoenix Islands Protected Area Scientific Advisory Committee. Rotjan is a member of The Explorers Club, a member of W2O (Women Working for Oceans), and is an active member of the editorial board for several peer-reviewed journals. She also serves on the Board of Directors for The Nature Conservancy-Caribbean, and the Friends of the Middlesex Fells.

Randi Rotjan

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Scuba Diving Safety: Risk vs. Reward

A review of the published diving accident and fatality data with a discussion of how divers can reduce risks and improve safety for themselves and those they dive with.

Presented by:
Dan Orr

Dan Orr is President of Dan Orr Consulting, providing a variety of services to the global diving community. Retired from the position of President of Divers Alert Network (DAN), Dan currently works with many non-profit and for-profit diving organizations including the Academy of Underwater Arts & Sciences, DEMA, the RSTC, Force Blue, the UHMS, Best Publishing, and WCH Media Group. He has authored and co-authored hundreds of articles and published books and manuals on diving topics including Scuba Diving Safety. He is an Associate Boston Sea Rover, a NOGI Award Fellow, a member of the International Scuba Diving Hall of Fame and received the Leonard Greenstone Award for Diving Safety.

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Sea-thru: A Method for Removing Water from Underwater Images

Sea-thru is a new, groundbreaking computer vision algorithm that removes water from underwater images. How and why does it work? It will help speed up the pace of marine science, extend the limits of ocean exploration, and change recreational and professional underwater photography.

Presented by:
Derya Akkaynak

Derya Akkaynak is a mechanical engineer and oceanographer (PhD MIT & WHOI ‘14) who studies problems of imaging and vision underwater. In addition to using off-the-shelf RGB cameras for scientific data acquisition underwater, she uses hyperspectral sensors to investigate how the world appears to non-human animals. Derya has professional, technical, and scientific diving certifications and has conducted underwater fieldwork in the Bering Sea, Red Sea, Antarctica, Caribbean, Northern and Southern Pacific and Atlantic, and her native Aegean. Akkaynak is an honoree for the 2019 Blavatnik Awards for Young Scientists in physics and engineering. She is at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution.

Derya Akkaynak

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Seaweed Mariculture as a Tool to Help Protect Coral Reefs

Corals support some of our most diverse ecosystems but now are severely threatened by global
warming. Rising temperatures disrupt the vital symbiosis between the coral and the algae living
within their cells, causing bleaching and, often, death. Can anything be done to save corals?

Dr. Loretta Roberson of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) will describe a tough little coral that calls Cape Cod home. She will explain how she and colleagues investigate this coral’s remarkable ability to withstand warm
summers and freezing winters, unlike their tropical cousins who are sensitive to temperature changes of a few degrees. She will also discuss how she has borrowed an idea from corals themselves: improve water quality using algae to remove nitrogen and carbon dioxide – to help reefs and other nearshore ecosystems recover.

Presented by:
Loretta Roberson

Dr. Roberson holds a BS in Biology from California State University and a PhD in Biological Sciences from Stanford University. In 2003 she became Adjunct and later Assistant Professor at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan, PR, directing several research centers there. In 2016 she joined the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA where she is now Associate Scientist. Her interests are in environmental protection and conservation, sustainable energy, the oceans, and diving.

Loretta Roberson

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Solutions to Common Equalizing Problems for Freediving and Scuba Divers

Ted will discuss freediving equalization techniques, and address the most common equalization problems freedivers experience. He will also explain how these same techniques can also help scuba divers who struggle with equalization.

Presented by:
Ted Harty

Ted Harty began his professional underwater career as a Scuba Instructor for PADI, NAUI, and SSI in 2005. In 2008, he took his first freediving class with Performance Freediving International, participated in PFI’s first official Instructor program in 2009, and immediately started working for PFI. Ted went to his first freediving competition in 2009 as an overweight, out of shape scuba instructor and progressed from 80-90 ft free dives to 177 ft in 3 weeks. Breaking a USA Freediving record in 2011, his deepest freedive is 279ft, and his longest breath-hold is 7 minutes. He is the founder of Immersion Freediving, www.Freedivingsafety.com, and www.Onlineclasses.ImmersionFreediving.com

Ted Harty

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Stop Taking Pictures, Start Making Photos

The concept of “making a photo” brings creating images to a new more artistic level where photographers push imagery deeper than simply rendering what is in front of the camera. Through an understanding of technical, compositional, and conceptual elements of photography you can bring your images to a new and higher level. Learn how to translate this to underwater photography and make photos rather than take pictures.

Presented by:
Jake Stout

As the Boston Sea Rovers 2018 Summer Intern, Jake traveled around the US, Newfoundland, and Roatan working with and learning from experts in underwater science and photography.  Jake is currently a sophomore at Northeastern University and an accomplished photographer.  His photo of swarming sea nettles made in Monterey, CA was selected as a finalist for the 2018 National Geographic Photo competition. Jake currently photographs articles for the New England Aquarium as well as working on photojournalism studies around New England waters of his own.

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The Flower Garden – Exploring the National Reef of Texas

When asked for their favorite local dive site in the state, many Texas SCUBA divers jokingly say, “Cozumel.” In fact, the Lone Star State has an extensive coral reef system that was designated the 10th National Marine Sanctuary on 17 January 1992 and is the only marine sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico. The story goes that the Flower Garden got its name from fishermen who could see the colorful corals and sponges from their boats on the surface. Once you submerge, you can see how accurate the name is. The underwater topography reveals ranges of mountainous corals, punctuated by sponges and loads of sea life, including sharks and manta rays.

Presented by:
Paul Cater Deaton

Paul Cater Deaton is an award-winning writer, producer, director and cinematographer. He is based in Galveston, and works all over the world. Recent credits include “The Amazing Race,” HBO Documentaries, the Discovery Channel, and “Wild Honduras” for NatGeo Wild. Paul’s work has garnered several industry accolades, including Best Music Video at the Austin Music Awards (SXSW), a Bronze Telly, numerous Gold and Silver Addy Awards, and an Addy Best in Show Video. His Showdown at Tiger Beach was screened at over a dozen international film festivals, and won Best International Documentary Short at two of them.

Paul Cater Deaton

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The Magnificent Disaster: The Story of the SS Burdigala

Most divers head to Kea Island, Greece to explore her most famous shipwreck, the ocean liner HMHS Britannic, but one of the hidden gems of a visit to Kea is the SS Burdigala, a wreck that rests near Britannic in slightly shallower waters. In May of 2019, the Britannic expedition made two dives to Burdigala and the team was spellbound by the grandeur of this lesser known but strikingly beautiful ship. Burdigala sank on November 14, 1916, less than one week prior to the sinking of Britannic. The cause of her demise was a mine laid by the same U-boat as the one that laid the mine that sank Britannic. The shipwreck was discovered more recently and not identified until 2008, when a group of Greek divers visited her. A stunning sight, she sits upright on her keel at a depth of approximately 70 meters (231 feet).

Presented by:
Joe Mazraani Jennifer Sellitti and Rick Simon

Since childhood, Joe Mazraani has been fascinated by the sea. Growing up in Lebanon, Joe spent his summers by the Mediterranean. He immigrated to the U.S. at age 15 and became a certified diver in the mid-90s. Joe quickly took to diving sunken wrecks off the Northeast U.S. Exploration is a way of life for Joe. He owns and operates the dive vessel Tenacious, which was specifically acquired to accomplish several projects, including locating and exploring the U-550 and other deep, uncharted wrecks in the North Atlantic. A criminal defense attorney by trade, Joe holds is a certified closed circuit diver and is a U.S.C.G. licensed captain.

Jennifer Sellitti is a regular crew member of the dive boat Tenacious, managing a number of topside operations during dive trips.  She also performs historical research on the ships and helps locate ships that are the subject of new projects for the team.  Jennifer develops and delivers presentations on Tenacious projects with the goal of educating the public about the historical significance and importance of wreck diving in the North Atlantic.

Richard M. Simon (32) grew up diving and crewing on New England dive boats. Rick is a Boston Sea Rover & Frank Scalli Intern (2005) and  a TDI dive instructor holding both recreational and technical ratings. Rick is also the president of Manta Industries- a dive equipment manufacturing company; and is the vice president of Shoreline Diving Services, INC.- a commercial diving company specializing in inspection, salvage and construction. Rick is an avid diver; especially enjoying cave and wreck diving mostly on the East Coast but really anywhere around the world. When he is not diving he enjoys spending time on his with- with his wife Erin and their many farm animals.

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The Searchlight – An Obscure Weapon at Sea During World War One

The searchlight was a fascinating weapon of night-time fighting during WWI. The German fleet developed special tactics to exploit new light technologies and during the Battle of Jutland, they were put to novel use. This unique story can be experienced diving the ‘foul grounds’ of Scapa Flow – sites where shipwrecks have been salvaged.

Presented by:
Thomas Easop

Thomas Easop has been diving for over forty years and holds an expedition rebreather certification. Educated at Brooks Institute of Photographic Art and Science, he earned a BA in Color Technology with a minor in Industrial – Scientific Imaging. He has operated his own commercial studio since 1986 and is a master print maker.  The photography project entitled The Guns and Armour of Scapa Flow was begun in 1998 and is a catalogue of the naval warfare technology remaining on the German Imperial High Seas Fleet scuttled in Scapa Flow, using homemade large format film cameras and specialized exposure and lighting techniques.

Thomas Easop

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The Submerged, Historic WWII Planes of Northern PNG

Some of the fiercest battles of the South Pacific took place in Papua New Guinea. The program features dives on 6 WWII plane wrecks; a Japanese Zero, two Petes, and a Kate, along with an Australian Catalina. The program highlights two American B-25s with their incredible stories; one in the jungle and one in crocodile infested waters.

Presented by:
Jim & Pat Stayer

The Stayers are explorers and well-known underwater filmmakers dedicated to sharing shipwrecks, animal behavior, and remote dive destinations around the world. They have directed several evening film festivals and are popular presenters across North America. Jim & Pat have been diving for 45 years and their footage has appeared on several major networks worldwide. They have discovered several shipwrecks and have co-authored 3 books and produced 33 DVDs.  Jim & Pat are co-owners of Out of the Blue Productions, Associate Members of the Boston Sea Rovers and Pat is a member of the Women Divers Hall of Fame.

Jim & Pat Stayer

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Tools to Identify Organisms and Contribute Observations to Science

Learn how your observations can contribute to biodiversity science. Learn how to use iNaturalist to explore and share your observations from the natural world. iNaturalist.org is a joint initiative of the California Academy of Sciences and the National Geographic Society.

Part of the Sunday Marine Science and Conservation Public Forum – Citizen Science

Presented by:
Ted Maney

Ted Maney is a biology instructor and underwater researcher at Salem State University.  Formerly the Diving Safety Officer at Northeastern University and a past President of the American Academy of Underwater Sciences (AAUS), Ted has been training scientific divers and conducting underwater research for over 35 years.  Current research projects involve benthic marine ecology studies of rock walls, kelp beds, and eel grass communities in addition to offshore mussel aquaculture. Ted earned his M.S. at UMass Boston studying the ecology of the marine gastropod Lacuna vincta and its role as a member of the kelp bed community.

Ted Maney

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Underwater Archaeology by Remote – Going where no diver has gone…So Far!

Explore deep-water shipwrecks accessible only by remote aboard EV Nautilus and NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer as scientist ashore from the comfort of a sofa and computer! It is called ‘telepresence’ and it is becoming a new way to explore shipwrecks with a few strange marine creatures and surprises along the way… remotely.

Presented by:
Steve Nagiewicz

Captain Steve is a well-known wreck diver, charter boat operator and acknowledged authority on shipwrecks and scuba diving. His first book: Hidden History of Maritime New Jersey was published about the tragedies of shipwrecks off the New Jersey coast that played an important role in passenger safety and maritime commerce. Nagiewicz is a Fellow and former Executive Director of the Explorers Club, managed the  New Jersey Marine Science Laboratory and former Chairman of the Board for Shark Research Institute. He currently teaches Environmental and Marine Science at Atlantic City High School and Underwater Science & Technology and Underwater Archaeology at Stockton University.

Steve Nagiewicz

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Women and Diving: Equal Opportunity Versus Physiology

Women’s anatomy and physiology is of course different than men’s. Women are generally considered less strong but more flexible, and there are differences in risk awareness, body composition and hormones. How relevant this is to scuba diving and what it might mean for decompression is not well studied. We’ll look at the differences that have been explored in physiology and psychology research, and we’ll draw some conclusions about equal opportunity underwater.

Presented by:
Frauke Tillmans

Frauke Tillmans, PhD, is Research Director at the Divers Alert Network (DAN). Originally from Germany, Dr. Tillmans has a degree in Human Biology and a PhD specializing in oxidative stress (free radicals) which is involved in acute diving injuries and may affect long term health of divers. Dr. Tillmans is also a very experienced public safety diver, scientific diver, diving safety officer, and diving instructor. She has worked as a researcher in global collaborative projects covering decompression stress, inert gas narcosis, and oxygen toxicity and was employed with the German Navy before joining DAN in 2019.

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Please note that participants scheduled to speak at any Sea Rovers Clinic event are subject to last minute travel and work emergencies that are inherent when working with state-of-the-art gear being used to push the boundaries of exploration and discovery. Participant list subject to change at last moment – please come back often for updates and additions to our exciting film festival line up.
Boston Sea Rovers